The Story Of Carol

One evening I leaned over to look at something my husband was reading on his computer. As I touched his back, my left breast felt extremely sore. After doing a self-exam of my breast it appeared red and swollen. The next day I visited my gynecologist who immediately recommended me to a local imaging center for a mammogram. On June 6, 2013 I was diagnosed with Inflammatory Breast Cancer. The imaging center said I had little to no chance of survival. Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare and very aggressive disease with symptoms that include redness, swelling, tenderness and warmth in the breast. Inflammatory breast cancer accounts for 1 to 5 percent of all breast cancers diagnosed in the United States.


My husband sat in the waiting room numb and in disbelief with my diagnosis

My husband sat in the waiting room numb and in disbelief with my diagnosis. I received annual mammograms, exercised, ate healthy and always had a positive attitude about life. I taught nutrition for several years and presently teach courses on Attaining the Mental Edge at a local Pittsburgh college. How could someone who tried to do everything right to prevent breast cancer be diagnosed with this devastating disease?

My tumor started as an eight-by-seven centimeter mass in my left breast. I was shocked. There is no breast cancer in my family history and I was receiving periodic mammograms. However, inflammatory breast cancer progresses rapidly, often in a matter of weeks or months. When you are diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer it’s typically at stage 3 or 4.

Dr. Thomas Julian, a surgical oncologist and breast cancer specialist at Allegheny General Hospital (AGH), part of the Pittsburgh-based Allegheny Health Network, informed me about a clinical trial underway at the hospital of an investigational drug for inflammatory breast cancer, called Neratinib, that targets and blocks proteins that help cancer cells to grow.


Once accepted and enrolled in the clinical trial, the results of the treatment were almost immediate for me

Once accepted and enrolled in the clinical trial, the results of the treatment were almost immediate for me. On July 17, 2013, I was informed the tumor in my breast was nearly gone. After weeks/months of receiving chemotherapy, radiation and having a mastectomy, I was declared cancer free.

I founded the Glock Foundation to raise funds and inform breast cancer patients how significant and possibly lifesaving participating in a clinical trial can be upon their diagnosis. There is more oversight in a clinical trial than the standard care protocol. This process not only saved my life but could save the lives of so many other breast cancer patients.



Physicians


Dr. Thomas Julian
Dr. Thomas Julian

Director-Breast Surgical Oncology-AHN
NRG/NSABP PI AHN, Professor of Surgery-Drexel University College of Medicine
Professor of Surgery-Temple University School of Medicine
Dr. Antonios Christou
Dr. Antonios Christou

Antonios Christou, MD, FACP, practices medical oncology at Allegheny Health Network and is based at Allegheny General Hospital. Prior to joining AGH, Dr. Christou was employed with a private multi-specialty oncology and hematology practice in Milwaukee. He earned his medical degree from the University of Athens in Greece and he completed an Internal Medicine Residency at 251 General Air Force Hospital in Athens. Dr. Christou completed a second Internal Medicine residency at Saint Francis Hospital of Evanston in Illinois, and he completed a fellowship in Medical Oncology and training in Hematology at Indiana University in Indianapolis.

Dr. Mark Trombetta
Dr. Mark Trombetta

Mark Trombetta, MD, FACR, is nationally and internationally known for his work in making radiation treatments easier, less toxic and more effective for cancer patients.

Judith Schaad
Judith Schaad

PT, DPT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Ms. Schaad received a BS in Physical Therapy from the University of Pittsburgh, summa cum laude, in 1979. In 2012, she earned a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Chatham University. She has been certified as a wound specialist by the American Board of Wound Management since 1999. In 2002, she became certified as a Manual Lymphatic Drainage Therapist by the Academy of Lymphatic Studies. She is also board-certified as a lymphedema therapist by the Lymphology Association of North America.

Board of Directors


Carol Glock
Carol Glock
Founder and President

Carol Glock, M.Ed. founder and president of Glock Foundation is a graduate of Carlow University in psychology and education and obtained her master’s degree in Health Education from the Pennsylvania State University. She conducts various hospital, community health, sports and wellness education classes.


Julie Senchak
Julie Senchak
Vice President

Julie has been doing great work with MARC USA for more than seven years. As Associate Director, Interactive Program Management, she oversees and guides a wide breadth of interactive marketing projects including web, mobile app, text messaging, social channels and email. Her responsibilities include managing timelines, budget, goals, and tracking all web analytics for digital marketing efforts as well as managing a team of seven.


Tim Glock
Tim Glock
Secretary

Tim is a graduate of Brentwood High School. He attended Carnegie Mellon University and graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. He also has a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Pittsburgh.


Drew Keys
Drew Keys
Fund Development Director


Diane McClune
Diane McClune
Treasurer

Receiving a Bachelors Degree in Nursing from Pennsylvania State University, Diane went on to become Assistant Head Nurse at Beaver Valley Geriatric Center. She pursued a career in Coronary Care and became Assistant Director of Nursing at Heritage Valley Health System (HVHS).

Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Created with by the Glocks.